Alireza Mohammadi (University of Michigan-Dearborn) and Hafiz Malik (University of Michigan-Dearborn)

Motivated by ample evidence in the automotive cybersecurity literature that the car brake ECUs can be maliciously reprogrammed, it has been shown that an adversary who can directly control the frictional brake actuators can induce wheel lockup conditions despite having a limited knowledge of the tire-road interaction characteristics. In this paper, we investigate the destabilizing effect of such wheel lockup attacks on the lateral motion stability of vehicles from a robust stability perspective. Furthermore, we propose a quadratic programming (QP) problem that the adversary can solve for finding the optimal destabilizing longitudinal slip reference values.

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Let’s Authenticate: Automated Certificates for User Authentication

James Conners (Brigham Young University), Corey Devenport (Brigham Young University), Stephen Derbidge (Brigham Young University), Natalie Farnsworth (Brigham Young University), Kyler Gates (Brigham Young University), Stephen Lambert (Brigham Young University), Christopher McClain (Brigham Young University), Parker Nichols (Brigham Young University), Daniel Zappala (Brigham Young University)

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Denial-of-Service Attacks on C-V2X Networks

Natasa Trkulja, David Starobinski (Boston University), and Randall Berry (Northwestern University)

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Demo #6: Impact of Stealthy Attacks on Autonomous Robotic...

Pritam Dash, Mehdi Karimibiuki, and Karthik Pattabiraman (University of British Columbia)

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Demo #10: Security of Deep Learning based Automated Lane...

Takami Sato, Junjie Shen, Ningfei Wang (UC Irvine), Yunhan Jia (ByteDance), Xue Lin (Northeastern University), and Qi Alfred Chen (UC Irvine)

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